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Tiara 3200 Open Page 2

Tiara 3200 Open By Capt. Ken Kreisler — December 2003

Scion of Success
Part 2: One thing that hasn’t changed between the 3100 and 3200 is quality construction.
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Tiara 3200
• Part 2: Tiara 3200
• Tiara 3200 Specs
• Tiara 3200 Deck Plan
• Tiara 3200 Acceleration Curve
• Tiara 3200 Photo Gallery


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Looking at her cockpit, I could easily see how that extra foot of width and length gave the 3200 an edge over the 3100. With more than 68 square feet, she could handily serve the dual purposes of cruising and fishing. An in-transom baitwell can replace the fold-down lounge, and the starboard aft-facing seat just behind the helm seat can be swapped for a bait-prep station. (A wet bar and refrigerator are two more cockpit options.) Other fishing options include four Lee rod holders and port and starboard gunwale stowage lockers. The 3200 can even be topped off with a custom-built half-tower and `riggers. “That tower is one of the few things we do not do in house,” Everse pointed out.

Just as Tiara designers maximized the added length and beam above decks, they did so below. The interior of the 3200 is remarkably spacious for a 32-footer and compares quite favorably to similar boats, including the 3100. At 6'2", headroom in both boats is practically the same, and each has six portlights and three Bomar overhead hatches, thus offering plenty of ambient light.

But there is a difference in the port galley areas. The 3200’s Corian countertops are on one level as compared to the two levels found on the 3100. Whether this is a better feature seems more personal than functional. Still, 3100 owners partaking in a survey requested this change. There are also covers for the stainless steel sink and two-burner electric stovetop now, and I noted plenty of cabinets and drawer space in both boats. However, while the 3200’s under-counter refrigerator is a little small for cruising, by ordering the optional second refrigerator/ice maker for the cockpit, you’ll have more than enough space for provisioning for a long weekend’s excursion.

I found another big difference in the two boats’ sleeping accommodations. Where the 3100 had a forward double berth with a filler cushion, the 3200 features a queen-size pedestal berth with a step to either side and a stowage compartment beneath the mattress that opens up easily via a pair of gas-assisted rams. For more sleeping space, the dining settee to port easily converts to a sleeper below—the 3200 has a hi-lo table, whereas the 3100’s table had to be manually dismantled and stowed—and a Pullman berth above. The arrangement makes it a perfect spot for the kids.

As for stowage, with the available area under the island berth, a port-side closet in the forepeak, cabinets above the dinette, and deep hull-side shelves, the 3200 provides ample room for a long weekend or even for some extended cruising, as does the 3100.

To finish off a nicely designed interior, my test boat had the optional teak-and-holly sole (long a popular Tiara option), a standard 15-inch Sharp Aquos LCD television in its own cabinet (with a stowage locker behind it), and a Clarion four-speaker AM/FM stereo/CD player.

One thing that hasn’t changed between the 3100 and 3200 is quality construction. Tiara has long been known for a rugged yet beautifully finished build. However, on this calm day, the waters of Long Island Sound would offer no opportunity to test either her strength or seakeeping ability. Nevertheless, I noted her excellent sightlines all around, but did observe a fair amount of bow rise as I brought her through the 3000 rpm mark. I also noticed a nice turn of speed. My test boat had a pair of 385-hp Crusader 8.1 MPI gasoline inboards, which, according to my radar gun, produced a WOT speed of 34.7 knots (39.9 mph). When I settled her in at a comfortable 3500-rpm cruising speed, she registered 26.8 knots (30.8 mph). She’s also got decent cruising range: With all 256 gallons, my test boat should see a 170-NM range at a 3500-rpm cruise.

Replacing a popular boat like the 3100, after an almost 25-year run, may at first seem a daunting task. But give the 3200’s added length and beam, extra features, and subtle yet important styling changes, this new boat seems quite able to step right into the line as the heir apparent in this size range.

Tiara Yachts Phone: (616) 392-7163. www.tiarayachts.com.

Next page > Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the November 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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