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Sealine T60 Page 2

Sealine T60 By Alan Harper — November 2004

Jersey Lady

Part 2: Sealine’s modular construction methods are almost as clever as the 60’s layout.

   
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• Part 1: Sealine T60
• Part 2: Sealine T60
• Sealine T60 Specs
• Sealine T60 Deck Plan
• Sealine T60 Acceleration Curve
• Sealine T60 Photo Gallery

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But perhaps the most clever feature on this boat is also the most obvious: the deck layout. On most motoryachts of this size you come in from the cockpit and find yourself in the saloon. Go up a step or two onto the bridge deck, and you’re in the galley and dining area. This is a hangover from larger motoryachts, for owners who like to be seen lounging in luxury by those strolling on the quay but who also want a bit of privacy over dinner. On the T60, however, these two spaces are transposed: The saloon is up on the bridge deck, right behind the helm, enjoying great views from its elevated position out of the windshield and those big side windows. Skylight panels above the helm also add lots of sky to the scene. Meanwhile, the galley and dining area, with moveable furniture and a durable wenge hardwood floor, are down at cockpit level. For a cruising boat, this layout makes perfect sense: You need the view most when you’re relaxing, not when you’re eating. Why doesn’t everyone do it like this? Well, soon they just might.

Sealine’s modular construction methods are almost as clever as the 60’s layout. Whole areas of the accommodations are assembled clear of the hull, including all wiring and plumbing, which allows these services to be run and tested before the sections are lowered into the boat. Internal construction is substantially complete before the deck molding is secured onto the hull.

The joinery throughout the T60 is a high-quality confection of warm-hued pearwood complemented by pale beige upholstery and cream wool carpeting. Zebra ebony and madronna burr provide striking and attractive notes of contrast, as do the dark hardwood flooring, the leather around the helm area, and, of course, the Kirkstone granite countertop. The bold lacquerwork in the galley is described as “aubergine” by Sealine’s stylists. I guess “eggplant” wouldn’t quite cut it. And let’s face it, it’s purple. I would have preferred to see more fiddle rails around the surfaces, particularly in the galley and saloon. They keep things in place and off the floor.

Not that this stately flagship offers anything other than a dignified ride. Although lighter than most of her contemporaries—check out those impressive acceleration figures—and a lively performer with the standard 800-hp Caterpillars, the hull is reassuringly stable. As she rose through her own wake—the only sizeable waves we could find on test day—it was possible to feel the impact in her aft sections (deadrise aft is just 13 degrees) but the forefoot is a nice, sharp 45 degrees, and deadrise amidships is a respectable 22 degrees. It felt like a good seagoing hull, and with the steering set up to give just three turns of the wheel lock to lock, she was enjoyably responsive to drive.

The coast of Jersey is spectacularly pretty. As a backdrop to a boat test it couldn’t have been better. In spite of the water’s fearsome tendency to disappear twice a day, as if a giant plug had been pulled, it was easy to see why these are some of the most popular cruising waters in Europe—even with one eye constantly on the chart, and the other nervously checking the depthsounder. The beaches are broad and sandy, and there are enough bays and inlets for everyone. Your only companions at anchor are likely to be an occasional intrepid Englishman and a scattering of local boats. Listen out for their anchor chains, though. When they start to come up it’s a sure sign the tide has turned and that it is definitely time to go.

Global Yachts Phone: (305) 371-2628. www.globalyachts.com.

Next page > Sealine T60 Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the October 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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