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BOATS

BOAT TESTS

Galeon 420 Fly

CONDITIONS DURING BOAT TEST

Air temperature: 86°F; humidity: 60%; seas: 3-4'

LOAD DURING BOAT TEST

109 gal. fuel, 0 gal. water, 2 persons, 20 lb. gear.

TEST BOAT SPECIFICATIONS

Test Engine: 2/425-mhp Cummins Marine QSB 5.9 diesels

Transmission/Ratio: ZF80A, w/ 1.96:1 gear ratio

Props: 23 x 29 copper-aluminum alloy Clements 4-blades

Price as Tested: $679,895

The Numbers

Galeon 420 Fly - Final Boat Test Numbers:
RPM KNOTS GPH RANGE dB(A)
1000 6.5 2.8 606 64
1500 8.7 8.8 258 69
2000 12.9 21.0 160 71
2500 20.5 34.4 156 77
2750 24.9 42.5 153 80
Speeds are two-way averages measured w/ GPS display. GPH estimates via Cummins display. Range is based on 90% of advertised fuel capacity. Sound levels measured at the lower helm. 65 dB(A) is the level of normal conversation.

OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT ON TEST BOAT

Noteworthy Options: Interior wenge matte paint ($13,976)
bimini top ($9,188)
hyrdraulic swim platform w/ teak ($37,117).

On Location

Better Boat: Cookin’ It Up (or Down) in the Galley

Galeon 420 Fly galleyGaleon goes to great lengths to ensure that not only are its boats great for cruising with friends and family, but they are also tailored to its customers’ wants. The boat is semi-custom in that her layout can be done in multiple ways. The galley, for example, can go either up in the saloon, or down on the accommodations deck.

There’s a debate that has raged for some time. Generally speaking, having the galley up is the American way of laying out the boat, as Americans tend to like to do their own cooking, and want to be able to socialize while doing so. (Notice that issue of Bon Appetit on the coffee table there? Exactly.)

Also stereotypically speaking, Europeans tend to like the galley down, so a hired chef can prepare the meal while guests wait for it in privacy. It’s slightly more elegant but a bit less family-friendly.

Either way is perfectly OK. I’ve attended a family function or two when I was all too happy to slip away to do some work in the kitchen. So the galley-down has its time and place. But, I’m also an optimist. If I invited people to spend time on my own boat, hopefully they’d be people I’d want to hang out with—even while chopping garlic. 

This article originally appeared in the October 2013 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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