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Carver 65 Marquis Page 3

Carver 65 Marquis By Richard Thiel — May 2004

Second Generation

Smooth Mover
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Carver 65
• Part 2: Carver 65
• Smooth Mover
• Carver 65 Specs
• Carver 65 Deck Plan
• Carver 65 Acceleration Curve
• Carver 65 Photo Gallery


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After recording test data on Carver’s new Marquis 65, I had a chance to really put the big, curvaceous motoryacht through her paces. Conditions were perfect—seas beyond the Fort Lauderdale jetties were averaging four to six feet, and a northerly wind was gusting to 25 mph. Moreover, time was on my side—the boat was all mine for a whole afternoon.

Driving the 65 was amazing. I could zoom around at speeds between 25 and 30 mph, up-sea, down-sea, and side-sea, with almost complete disregard for the bumps, potholes, and occasional drop-offs beneath the hull. Top hop was a rousing 37.9 mph, and turning was steady, inboard leaning, and fairly tight for a vessel with V-drive running gear.

Down-sea handling was especially sweet. With true, gray-bearded honkers bearing down and with my trusty hands resting on the wheel, not wrestling with it, the 65 proceeded south like a Freightliner barreling down I-95. Hardly any yaw at all!

One problem cropped up, however. Carver had installed Volvo Penta’s QL trim tabs on my test boat, and they started messing up as we returned to Lauderdale harbor. While I had no trouble getting the things down to gauge responsiveness at speed, getting them all the way back up at idle—or at least getting the indicators to read all the way back up—was another story. Some mechanical and/or electrical adjustment is necessary here, for sure.

Otherwise, the smooth drivability of the 65 handed me more baseball-cap-on-backwards fun than I’ve had in quite some time. And furthermore, sightlines from the bridge were good, the instrumentation on the dashboard was savvily set up, and the helm seat was comfy.

Couple such virtues with the existence of two big, torquey props in addition to two big, powerful Sidepower bow thrusters (one fore and the other aft), all of which team up to produce a level of docking delicacy that’s darn near surgically precise, and I’d say Carver’s got a real winner here. —Capt. Bill Pike

Next page > Carver 65 Marquis Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

This article originally appeared in the April 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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