Subscribe to our newsletter

Boats

Carolina Classic 35 Page 2

PMY Boat Test: Carolina Classic 35 continued
Carolina Classic 35 — By Capt. Patrick Sciacca — February 2002

Flare for Tradition
Part 2: Carolina Classic 35 continued
   
 
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Carolina Classic 35
• Part 2: Carolina Classic 35 continued
• Carolina Classic 35 Specs
• Carolina Classic 35 Deck Plan
• Carolina Classic 35 Acceleration Curve
• Carolina Classic 35 Photo Gallery


 Related Resources
• Boat Test Index

 Elsewhere on the Web
• Carolina Classic

The diesels sit directly under the helm area and are easily accessed at all points. Flick a starboard-side switch under the gunwale, and the engines are revealed in full. The engines' proximity did result in some higher than average sound level readings. I measured a peak of 87 dB-As at the helm at 2000 rpm, which would be a typical running speed. (Normal conversation is 65 dBs.)

With the testing done, it was my turn at the wheel. The Teleflex SeaStar steering felt slick as I cut a near-perfect circle at about 34.5 mph, noting that the 35 leaned slightly into the turn. The dual-lever Hynautic hydraulic controls felt familiar from the get-go and made her easy to spin on her length as well as throttle up and down the engines' rpm range. Her maneuverability is aided by big 24x31 4-blade S&S propellers. And when the Cummins were between 1500 and 1750 rpm, I could feel the 35 take off like a thoroughbred coming down the stretch.

Sight lines at the helm are excellent, although I did need to make a slight adjustment of the Trim Master tabs to maintain visibility as she got up on plane. The electronics console area is large and could easily handle several displays, an autopilot, and more, but our boat had not been outfitted with electronics on test day. Visibility aft to the cockpit is clean from the Pompanette helm chair, so keeping an eye on your lines in the six rod holders or 11 optional rocket launchers shouldn't be a problem.

Along with her superior rough-water ride, one look around the cockpit tells you she was built to fish. The 85-square-foot cockpit offers a ton of fish-fighting room, and two 55-gallon in-deck gasketed fishboxes will easily store your quarry for the ride home. The starboard-side transom door is great for larger-than-average fish (or if you want to keep your chiropractor bills to a minimum). In addition, the cockpit bait station to port offers a sink, refrigerator, freezer, and 12 tackle drawers. Rounding out the fishing amenities on our boat were two Lee Senior outriggers.

Now you could consider the 35 a midsize battlewagon, but that doesn't mean she's all tomboy. Below decks she offers 6'6" headroom and a large diagonal double berth forward, which is a great place to nap on the way out to the edge and hides ample stowage below. The 35's open arrangement here keeps this area airy, while a Bomar hatch above keeps it bright. Abaft the forward berth on the port side, the galley with teak and holly sole offers a two-burner Princess cooktop, Dino refrigerator, GEM microwave, and Corian countertop, all standard. A Quasar TV is also standard and best viewed from the starboard-side lounge, which converts to upper and lower bunks for guests.

With the 35's fuel economy and 435-gallon fuel capacity (a 325-gallon main tank and two 55-gallon saddle tanks), cruising this boat would not be out of the question. She offers a range of more than 350 NM at 2250 rpm at a speed of almost 35 mph. In addition, her express layout with L-shape settee to port of the helm and cockpit offers a lot of space for entertaining. Horowitz told me he started to cruise his 28 this year with his wife and two children as well as fish the boat but was looking at the 35 for more accommodations.

Suffice it to say that whether they're straight-out fishermen or fishermen/cruisers like Horowitz, people are taking a liking to Privott's style of boat. Privott told me the 35 is back-ordered through the summer, and his boats can now be found fishing the waters of Europe, South Africa, and Japan.

The Carolina Classic 35 is a rugged, rough-water boat that comes from proud Carolina boatbuilding craftsmen. Her no- nonsense layout should appeal to longtime fishermen as well as newbies. And as there is rough water everywhere, from the bays and oceans to the Great Lakes, the Carolina Classic 35 is a tradition you may want to become familiar with.

Carolina Classic Boats Phone: (252) 482-3699. Fax: (252) 482-4099. www.carolinaclassicboat.com.

Next page > Carolina Classic 35 Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

Related Features