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Aicon 64 Page 2

Exclusive: Aicon 64 By Capt. Patrick Sciacca — April 2005

Nuovo Euro

Part 2: Besides an original interior appearance and an upscale, contemporary layout, the 64’s got performance.

   
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• Part 1: Aicon 64
• Part 2: Aicon 64
• More Than Style
• Aicon 64 Specs
• Aicon 64 Deck Plan
• Aicon 64 Acceleration Curve

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That feeling is carried over to the full-beam (17'4") master with a berth that is slightly under king size and low profile because, as Broich commented, “People want to fall into bed, not step up to it.” It’s only 15 inches from the sole to the top of the berth’s platform (add five more inches to the top of the mattress). Headroom here averages about 6'8". Once you step out of bed, you can take in wonderful vistas from the two 33-inch Nemo portholes that flank the berth. Make sure they’re not open while underway, though, as they are only about two feet above the waterline. Still, the 64 has a Class A CE rating, which means she qualifies for unlimited ocean voyages. The master also features a walk-in closet and drawers that average 32 inches wide and 14 inches deep. The en suite head, also with 6'8" headroom, offers a Tecma MSD and stand-up shower with seating for two.

The master stateroom is impressive, but guests in the forepeak VIP will feel like kings, too. It features a step-up queen-size berth, en suite head, and seven-foot headroom. Just aft and to port is another stateroom with two single berths that are a great fit for the kids. The forepeak features two closets, while the kid’s room has stowage above the outboard berth as well as a small closet. (For additional information about the 64’s features, see “More Than Style,” this story).

Besides an original interior appearance and an upscale, contemporary layout, the 64’s got performance, thanks to standard twin 1,350-hp MANs with walkaround access. My test day was cut short due to an electrical problem that prevented the engines from starting. However, PMY was back on the scene to get the numbers when the engines were fixed a couple of days later. The 64 made an average top speed of 39.7 mph with a fuel burn of 125.2 gph with the diesels turning their rated 2300 rpm. Although her engines were making rpm, they seem to have been burning about 15 gph less than those MANs should at WOT. I suspect she may be slightly underpropped. With engines cut back to 2000 rpm, she hit a comfortable cruise speed of 33.8 mph with a fuel burn of 91.4 gph. Taking into account her 965-gallon fuel capacity, the 64 can travel more than 320 miles at cruise speed before needing a pit stop, which is plenty of range for a cruise down the coast for a weekend with friends.

So, what is Euro? Damned if I know anymore. Although the Aicon 64 comes from Europe, she’s taking the concept of Euro-styling in a new direction, and I think that’s a positive thing. It helps prevent the homogenization that can cause something good to transform into a fad or flavor of the month. Perhaps the 64 represents the next evolution in European yacht styling.

When you take into account her progressive look, well-arranged interior space, large outdoor entertainment areas such as the flying bridge with grill and wet bar and room for more than a dozen guests, cockpit for alfresco lunches, and admirable performance, the Aicon 64 may just be redefining the Euro look. Perhaps, nuovo Euro?

Aicon Yachts ( (954) 786-0211. www.aiconyachts.com.

Next page > More Than Style > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the March 2005 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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