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Jason Y. Wood's blog

Can It

Cisco Brewers images: Katie Kaizer PhotographyThe craft-beer revolution has passed many boaters by. Why? Those snobby breweries only used glass bottles—until now. By leaving fragile, heavy bottles to the landlubbers, breweries and beer drinkers get many benefits: Cans don’t break, chill faster, take up less space, and protect beer from harmful light. Remember though, if you do enjoy some suds at sea, let someone else take the helm. Here are some seaworthy choices.

Monte Carlo Yachts Introduces New 70 at Trieste Bash

Photo by Jason Y WoodWe made a quick trip to Trieste over the weekend to join Monte Carlo Yachts in welcoming its new 70. The gleaming yacht was the belle of the ball, making a striking impression on the hard in the main piazza of this northeastern Italian city.

The Old Man and the Online Stop-Motion Video

Old ManThis video posted on PBS’s American Masters Tumblr sent me scurrying to my bookshelf (I know I have a first edition here somewhere…). But if you only have a few minutes, it’s an easy way (and pretty remarkable to watch) to get reacquainted with one of the great stories of our time: Ernest Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea.” One caveat/disclaimer: I didn’t pick the music.

Getting It Ironed Out

Photo courtesy of CCATalk about strange bedfellows, offshore oil rigs now have a vigorous champion in a conservation group, the Coastal Conservation Association. At issue is not the pollution caused by such catastrophes as the Deepwater Horizon explosion. Instead the sticking point is the steel legs of the now-idle drilling platforms, encrusted with coral and teeming with life.

Electronics Update: GPS Invasion Slowed—For Now

FCC logoLast week, we discovered a company called LightSquared filed for bankruptcy protection. You may recall from coverage in the May issue of Power & Motoryacht that LightSquared is developing a 4G broadband cellular network that has the unfortunate side effect of interfering with GPS signals.

Going Soft

While the briny tang of a raw oyster slipping across the tongue is a distant memory come summertime (for those who still abide by those rules), it’s high time to turn your thoughts to other seasonal delectations. Enter the softshell crab for an all-too-short visit: Flavor and texture are at their peak from now until August, and, as usual, the simplest recipe is the best with the freshest seafood.

Give Yourself a Break

The fish are out there. Or more accurately, down there, out of sight. And while sometimes it’s just nice to get out and chase them around, striving to improve your chances of hooking up makes your time, fuel, and gear investments look a little more worthwhile. That’s where Mitch Roffer, PhD, comes in. Roffer founded Roffer’s Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service (ROFFS) to help take a chunk of guesswork out of anglers’ offshore fishing experience. And if you’ve got sea-surface temperature charts on your MFD, or are thinking about getting them, you need to know what Roffer has to say.

Freeze Now, Chill Out Later

There’s something to be said for grilling or eating fresh food aboard. But sometimes, thanks to a late arrival to an anchorage due to challenging conditions, or better yet, too-good-to-leave-on-time conditions at your last stop, it’s good to have an easy backup plan for a great meal—you know you can do better than hot dogs or a can of Dinty Moore. What better dish to have on hand than a frozen pot pie?

Does Yacht Design Matter?

photo courtesy of Riva Yacht           

To answer this blog’s titular question in short: Of course it does. The real question, masked by that rhetorical one, is “How much does yacht design matter?” It matters to boaters, and to those who are thoughtful enough to understand the importance of boat design in the greater context of how it represents and reminds us of our collective past, and how its halo affects other kinds of design.

Go Toward the Light


One night in the well-lit rivers and canals of Fort Lauderdale (during the boat show, no less) gave me a sense of what boaters can’t see when they rely on the naked eye. Seems that the docklights, street lamps, and hotel-walkway lights could confuse boaters nearly as much as they help, thanks to the glare and reflections. But I really didn’t know what I was missing until I was able to compare the view through a FLIR thermal-imaging camera. I brought my own video camera along to see what its lens recorded of the view from the bow and what I could see on the thermal-imaging display. See for yourself how they match up here.