Subscribe to our newsletter

Blogs

A Style All His Own

We just found this glimpse of our beloved Sightlines columnist, yacht designer extraordinaire Michael Peters in cyberspace. And try as we might to keep him all to ourselves, we found out he was discovered by Cadillac. Peters was interviewed in a quick YouTube video program by Chris Hardwick, a comedian, actor, and host whom you may sort of recognize from some of his other jobs—anyway he clearly doesn't get out much.

Into the Maelstrom with a Viking

OK, maybe maelstrom is too strong a word, but when I tested the Viking 42 ST today off of Riviera Beach, it just wasn’t really all that pleasant, weather-wise. The rain was slamming down, the wind was conjuring up whitecaps, and confused four footers made the Atlantic an interesting place to test a boat that easily surpasses 30 knots.

The teak helm onboard the Viking 42 ST.

Change for the Better

A year ago I was a senior editor at this magazine and how times have changed for me. For one thing, my interactions with the boaters, boatbuilders, and other industry people who are our readers have increased exponentially, and I couldn’t be happier. I may have my radar turned way up, but I try to tune in to what each of them is saying when we talk or e-mail. Not just listening, of course, but also hearing the backstory. Those readers’ experiences inform what they’re telling me and give insight into their worldview.

Rough Seas

While they’ve been considered things of legend for ages, or the exaggerated tales of mariners, rogue waves (or freak waves, or monster waves, or whatever you’d like to call them) are indeed real and something every mariner should be aware of. In the last few years alone, rogue waves were blamed for the deaths of two American tourists during separate incidents in Cabo san Lucas, as well as the deaths of four fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico. And since the turn of the century rogue waves have damaged several cruise ships and caused a number of other fatalities.