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Pershing 56 Page 2

Pershing 56 By Jeffrey Moser — July 2006

Sexy Beast

This Italian beauty boasts both high style and blazing speed.

   
Courtesy of Pershing
 More of this Feature

• Pershing 56
• Pershing 56 Part 2
• Pershing 56 Specs
• Pershing 56 Deck Plan
• Pershing 56 Acceleration Curve
• Pershing 56 Photo Gallery

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• Boat Test Index

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As for that third stateroom, Pershing wisely made it optional on U.S. models, since although its starboard aft location wouldn’t compromise the lines of the saloon, it would eliminate the stowage cabinet—complete with Pershing-logo crockery—on the aft bulkhead and cut into the master stateroom. And while it wouldn’t reduce the size of the full-beam aft master, it would severely limit its stowage, which on my test boat was a fit-for-a-clotheshorse, 6'3" long by 4'3" wide, walk-in closet, with two built-in drawers roomy enough to hold a dozen pairs of Manolo Blahniks. Strong Asian influences are here as well: A shoji screen like the galley’s leads to an en suite head and diffuses light emanating from the windows, which are framed in wenge, a dark wood whose deep chocolate color blends well with the galley’s orange sink and stateroom’s light pearwood. Wenge is used in the stateroom’s windows, the vanity countertop, and queen berth’s nightstands as well.

It just so happens that as I’m on my way up to the cockpit, Datson is boarding. He quickly takes a seat at the starboard-side helm, starts the standard twin MAN V12s, and maneuvers the 56 away from the dock. Within minutes of clearing the inlet, we’re blazing across a flat Atlantic at an average top speed of 57 mph. And just like that Pershing I saw off Miami, the 56’s Arneson 12L drives are blowing a roostertail high off our stern.

Datson slows her to idle, and we switch positions. Keeping my eye on the Arneson’s trim indicators and the rpm readouts on the MAN displays, I start to raise the drives at about 1600 rpm, and the 56 jumps from under 15 mph to nearly 42 mph at 1750 rpm in an eye bat. At 55.6 mph and 2200 rpm, she carves 180s in less than two boat lengths, generating sufficient Gs to land an oblivious passenger in the drink: The helmsman will want to warn his guests before he puts the 56 into a high-speed turn and be alert himself, as the sightlines in the opposite direction are pretty much obscured when the 56 heels over.

The Pershing 56 is obviously an exciting ride, but ultimately she succeeds because she delivers high style and blazing speed, qualities infused in Italian culture. But don’t take my word for it. Consider an endorsement of a longtime Pershing owner, an Italian fellow whose wealth could have afforded him any vessel and whose surname has been synonymous with Italian speed and style since 1929: Ferrari.

MarineMax (866) 693-3293. www.marinemax.com.


Spotlight on | Sunpad/Tender Garage

The large, port-side sunpad is a defining feature of the Pershing’s cockpit. At 6'3"x9'3", it has enough room for three sunbathers on its well-padded vinyl cushions. But this area’s not just for the sun worshipper: The forward cushions can be removed for engine-room entry via a three-foot-square hatch, and its aft section lifts hydraulically for access to the tender garage, which can stow a PWC or ten-foot dinghy.


Spotlight on | Cockpit

The 56’s teak cockpit is ready to entertain guests with two L-shape settees that’ll accommodate a dozen people and a port-side, alfresco galley that’s complete with a ,fridge/freezer, barbeque, wet bar, and ice maker. There’s also plenty of shade under a carbon fiber hardtop. But if guests are craving a tan, send them to either the foredeck or aft sunpad, or simply press a button and open the 56-footer’s 6'3" x 9'3" electrically actuated sunroof.

The starboard-side helm is also made of carbon fiber, with a pearl-gray matte finish, which, as I discovered, reduces glare when the roof’s open, making the chartplotter and gauges easy to read.


Next page > Pershing 56: Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the August 2006 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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