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Megayachts

America’s 100 Largest Yachts 2004 Page 3

America’s 100 Largest Yachts - 2004

By Diane M. Byrne

   

Reverie (#8)
Photo: Bill Muncke
 More of this Feature

• Top 100: Part 1
• 1-9
• 10-19
• 20-29
• 30-39
• 40-49
• 50-59
• 60-69
• 70-79
• 80-89
• 90-100
• Yacht Spotter


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10. BIG ROI 206'0"
Twenty-one-and-a-half million dollars will buy you this yacht, owned by Home Shopping Network founder Roy Speer, who we’re told hasn’t really cruised much aboard. This blue-hulled expedition yacht has a 3,000-square-foot owner’s deck, complete with a library/ office, private saloon, and its own elevator. She features a mahogany interior and Italian-crafted furniture from Milan.
Y: 2002; B: Royal Denship, Denmark; N: Tom Fexas Yacht Design; H: Steel; E: 2/2,000-hp Caterpillars

11. APOGEE 205'0"
Available for charter for up to $320,000 per week, Apogee offers some interesting features spread out over four decks. There’s an elevator that can take guests to the sundeck, where they can work on their tan or work out in the gym. If someone is a good singer (or at least a legend in his/her own mind), the karaoke machine and Wurlitzer jukebox are sure to be big hits. Her owner is Darwin Deason, the former chairman of the board of Affiliated Computer Services in Texas.
Y: 2003; B: Codecasa, Italy; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/2,260-hp Caterpillars

12. LADY LOLA 205'0"
Here’s a yacht that’s impossible not to have fun aboard. Besides having a highly publicized, retractable driving range, Lady Lola also has an outdoor cinema and a pool with a two-level waterfall. She also has toys like a 36-foot high-speed catamaran, an amphibious automobile, and a four-passenger submarine all stowed aboard her “shadow”—a 180-foot support vessel named, appropriately, Shadow. The yacht and her support vessel are the pride and joy of Duane and Lola Hagadone of Idaho, who recently sponsored a fundraiser for the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theater in their home state (and which was attended by John Travolta).
Y: 2002; B: Oceanco, South Africa/Holland; N: The “A” Group-Monte Carlo SAM; H: Steel; E: 2/2,000-hp Caterpillars

13. ATTESSA III 205'0"
This yacht was launched as Aviva for European owners, but she was sold after a devastating fire. Thankfully the buyer was Montana industrialist and yacht-lover Dennis Washington, who has had her undergoing an extensive refit at Vancouver Shipyard in North Vancouver, British Columbia, for the better part of two years. The refit should be complete around the time you’re reading this. Washington hired Glade Johnson Designs to do the interior and restyling, the latter of which included the addition of a 55'x31' one-piece, molded fiberglass sundeck built by Northern Marine in Washington State.
Y: 1998; B: Feadship/C. Van Lent En Zonen, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/2,200-hp Caterpillars

14. CAKEWALK 203'5"
The owners of this yacht wanted her six guest suites to look like “the Orient Express of yachting.” Each is outfitted with a double bed, a Pullman berth, and what appears to be a chaise lounge that becomes another bed when the scroll headboard is removed. In addition, they feature elaborate marble, beautiful woodwork (incorporating various angles and intricate carvings), and individualized color schemes that evoke the six different seas they’re named for.
Y: 2000; B: Feadship/Royal Van Lent Shipyard, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/2,000-hp Caterpillars

15. PHOENIX 201'8"
Upon delivery in June, Phoenix headed to Oslo, Norway. She spent another part of the summer in Spain. Like many large yachts these days, she features the master stateroom on the main deck. But in a twist, the stateroom has a floating staircase that leads to an upper-deck study, which benefits from panoramic views and a private deck area forward. Phoenix also totes underwater scooters, wake boards, water skis, and dive equipment. Andrew Winch Designs created both her art deco interior design and exterior styling.
Y: 2004; B: Lürssen, Germany; N: Builder/Andrew Winch Designs; H: Steel; E: 2/2,330-hp MTUs

16. MYLIN IV 200'0"
This Feadship is a familiar sight in South Florida waters. Makes sense, as her owner is Micky Arison, who heads Carnival Cruise Lines and owns the Miami Heat basketball team.
Y: 1992; B: Feadship/Royal Van Lent Shipyard, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/3,300-hp MTUs

17. MÉDUSE 198'10"
Seen in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, earlier this year, Méduse is part of Paul Allen’s fleet (see nos. 2, 4). The yacht used to have her own Web site, featuring information on her systems as well as an interactive map of some of her journeys, but it was taken down. No matter, for she still garners plenty of attention wherever she goes. Her name means “jellyfish” in French.
Y: 1996; B: Feadship/De Vries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,700-hp Caterpillars

18. PARAFFIN 197'2"
To say this yacht has an extensive supply of wines to choose from is the understatement of the year; there are literally hundreds of bottles stowed in a climate-controlled “cellar” and enough glassware to permit nearly two dozen people to enjoy a tasting menu ranging from champagne to port without the need to wash a single glass.
Y: 2001; B: Feadship/Royal Van Lent Shipyard, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/2,000-hp Caterpillars

19. INTUITION II 193'7"
If you see Intuition II and mistake her for a commercial ship, you’re only half wrong; she was originally part of the Dutch pilot boat fleet but converted for pleasure use about five years ago. Since then she has crossed the Atlantic and visited Mexico, among other places, although you’re most apt to see her in Sag Harbor, New York. Since the owner, Pat Malloy, has a racing background, there are half-hull models aboard.
Y: 1974/1999; B: Amels, Holland/Vosper Thornycroft (UK), England; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 1/1,330-hp Smit Slikkerveer electric motor and 3/650-hp Deutz-MWMs

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This article originally appeared in the October 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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