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America’s 100 Largest Yachts 2004

America’s 100 Largest Yachts - 2004

By Diane M. Byrne

   



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The sun has risen.

To be more accurate, Rising Sun is here.

Arguably the most highly anticipated delivery of the year, Rising Sun has been shrouded in secrecy since being commissioned.

Well, she wasn’t a complete secret: As typically happens in the yacht biz, word began getting out that a project at Lürssen known as LE120 was a 120-meter (393-footer) for the CEO of Oracle Corporation, Larry Ellison. Soon word emerged directly from Ellison; he couldn’t resist discussing the yacht in Softwar, his 2003 biography, including the fact that the budget was $200 million.

Despite the far-too-few details we’ve learned about her, we know Ellison got quite a yacht for his money. But we realize $200 million may be a shocking sum to many of you. (Heck, our staff gets a stomachache just thinking about that kind of money.) So we thought you—and, of course, Larry (if we can call you that, Larry)—would find it interesting to see what else $200 million can buy in the megayacht realm:

For the ultimate world-cruise experience, you could purchase the two largest American-owned expedition yachts available for sale, Bart Roberts (no. 5) for $25 million and Big Roi (no. 10) for $21.5 million. And oh, what the heck, round out your collection with yet another expedition yacht, Pangaea (no. 30), for $24.9 million.

Hmm, you’d still have nearly $129 million left over. And Bart Roberts’ pirate theme might be too much for you, Larry, given your predilection for Japanese style.

Okay, so try this: Just because you can, purchase the most expensive yacht available worldwide, Pegasus (no. 24). After all, her six guest suites are named after different Greek isles and have different marbles evoking those themes. True, the feeling isn’t the same as that of the Land of the Rising Sun, but it’s still creative.

On second thought, that won’t work, either; she’s only $56.9 million. Even if you’d purchased the expedition yachts, too, you’d have about $72 million in your pocket.

Well, there’s only one solution: write the check out to us, and we’ll do our darndest to spend it.

Without further fantasy spending, here are “America’s 100 Largest Yachts.”

KEY: L=length; Y=year launched (where two dates are given, the second is a refit date); B=builder; N=naval architect; H=hull material; E=engines

Next page > 1-9 > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

This article originally appeared in the October 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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