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Megayachts

America’s 100 Largest Yachts 2003

America’s 100 Largest Yachts - 2003

By Diane M. Byrne

   
 More of this Feature

• Top 100: Part 1
• 1-9
• 10-19
• 20-29
• 30-39
• 40-49
• 50-59
• 60-69
• 70-79
• 80-89
• 90-100
• Yacht Spotter


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• Megayacht Feature Index

POW! SOCK! OOF! If you were even remotely near a TV set in the late 1960’s and into the 1970’s, you likely remember these words prominently (and, if you had the right set, colorfully) bursting onto the screen. They punctuated the climactic fight scenes in the Batman series, making the campy show all the more fun to watch.

When the series hit the big screen in the 1960’s, some of the coolest Bat Toys made their debut. Sure, Batman and Robin already had the Batmobile when they needed to bolt out of Wayne Manor, but the movie producers wanted something more—something that would, well, blow the competition out of the water. So what did they do? They created the Batboat, of course. Admit it: Whether you were an adult or a wide-eyed kid, you were impressed.

But you’re a mature adult now, so you only have time for serious things, right? But wait a second—remember that day when the biggest yacht you’d ever seen pulled into your marina? You wondered right out loud what size she was. And what about the time you recognized Leslie Wexner’s Limitless or Paul Allen’s Tatoosh and called our office or dashed off a letter to us? (You know who you are.) Like the Caped Crusader solving one of The Riddler’s teasers, we’ve got you figured out: You’re still that kid who wanted to drive the Batboat more than the Batmobile. You, like all of us here, are amazed at the size of these yachts and curious about their features.

Here’s your chance to revisit that pure wonder. As we do every year with “America’s 100 Largest Yachts,” we include the LOA and other specifications after each name (see the key at right).

What yachts will debut on next year’s list? Stay tuned—same bat time, same bat channel.

KEY: L=length; Y=year launched (where two dates are given, the last is a refit date); B=builder; N=naval architect; H=hull material; E=engines

Next page > 1-9 > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

This article originally appeared in the October 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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